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Re: España | Blas Cantó - 'Universo'

Publicado: Lun 29 Jun, 2020 11:58
por Pal
Errores aparte esta entretenida. Es una comedia y no es una burla al festival.

Re: España | Blas Cantó - 'Universo'

Publicado: Lun 29 Jun, 2020 12:45
por valen
Dudo que los creadores conozcan a Sergey. Pinta que no han visto más allá del 2014. Han querido meter la pulla a Rusia, sin más.

Re: España | Blas Cantó - 'Universo'

Publicado: Lun 29 Jun, 2020 13:06
por juanralvaro
valen escribió:
juanralvaro escribió:-Quien adaptó esto al castellano se tomó según qué licencias... Que los islandeses versionen el Ding a Dong (ganadora del festival en 1975) en castellano en Islandia... :g)


La he visto en VOSE. En serio en la versión doblada al español la canción Ja ja Ding Dong la han puesto como Ding a Dong?


Sí, aparece cantada en castellano... :o

Re: España | Blas Cantó - 'Universo'

Publicado: Lun 29 Jun, 2020 13:10
por valen
LOL Pero cantan la Ding a Dong del festival? Porque tela con el fallo...

Re: España | Blas Cantó - 'Universo'

Publicado: Lun 29 Jun, 2020 13:57
por Pal
No es esa canción. Es una canción que crearon para la película

https://genius.com/Will-ferrell-and-mol ... ong-lyrics


What have the producers said about the song?
Savan Kotecha, executive producer of the soundtrack, explained alongside the song’s producer Christian Persson in a Vulture interview:

David Dobkin [the movie producer] says that there were at least three or four writing teams that tried to compose that song. “We were trying to create a bar song that Fire Saga didn’t write, because in the movie, supposedly, this is just a traditional song.” The director had the title in his head, but little else. “We knew it had to be a call-and-response to feel like a pub song,” says Kotecha. “It’s all about that chorus.”

The team that wound up writing the song was the same duo who wrote “Volcano Man,” Gustaf Holter and Christian Persson. “We wanted it to be super-cheesy, but also incredibly catchy at the same time,” says Persson. “’Stupid-catchy,’ we call it.” For the music, they were inspired by Dutch folksongs, which have prominent, slower bass lines around which swirl faster, happier melodies. Persson and Holter also loved the idea of creating crude song lyrics — “My love for you is growing wide and long … I swell and burst when I see what we’ve become” — that could be performed in a guileless, cheerful way, as if the singers didn’t really understand what they were saying. The results are weirdly irresistible. “I played it one time in my house — one time! — and my 11-year-old and 8-year-old were singing it for weeks,” says Dobkin. Kotecha says that people genuinely mistake it for a traditional song now. “I’ve had a few people tell me, ‘That’s like an Icelandic pub song or something?’ Like, nope! That’s a new song.’”